Tuesday, May 20, 2008

What does Petroleum studies about?

Petroleum Engineering Programs

The Petroleum Engineering program is primarily concerned with the economic extraction of oil and gas. This is accomplished through the design, drilling and operations of well systems, and the integrated management of hydrocarbon reservoirs—

The Mission is to have a high quality program in petroleum engineering that stresses innovation, integration, team work, high ethical standards and awareness of industry needs, in addition to, advanced research capabilities.

Another Vision is to be recognized worldwide as a center of excellence in education and research in the area of petroleum engineering.

General Objectives

The Petroleum Engineering program will prepare the graduate to:

1. Be a petroleum engineer who is qualified to achieve a successful career in the petroleum industry.

2. Have a good understanding of the scientific, mathematical and technical foundation of petroleum engineering to facilitate self learning and professional development.

3. Employ practical thinking with commitment to economic, innovative and optimum use of resources.

4. Promote professionalism, work ethics, social values and HSE issues.

Program Educational Outcomes

a) Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.

b) Ability to design and conduct experiments as well as to analyze and interpret data.

c) Ability to design a system, component, or process to meet the desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental and safety.

d) Ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.

e) Ability to identify/diagnose and solve petroleum engineering problems.

f) Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities.

g) Ability to communicate effectively in all written and oral forms.

h) Understanding of the impact of the petroleum industry in the global, economic, environmental and social context.

i) Recognition of the need for and the ability to engage in life-long learning.

j) Knowledge of contemporary issues.

k) Ability to use techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practices.

Academic Programs


Program Objectives

1. Petroleum Engineering Program


Introduction


Requirements


Curriculum


Course Prerequisite Flow Chart

2. Applied Petroleum Engineering Program


Introduction


Requirements


Curriculum

3. Undergraduate Course Descriptions


Course Descriptions

4. Graduate Program


Introduction


M. S. Program


Ph. D Program


Course Descriptions

Program Objectives

Petroleum Engineering Program Objectives

The petroleum engineering program has three educational objectives:


- Graduates will be competitive in the petroleum engineering job market or in continuing their education;


- Graduates will be skilled practitioners of petroleum engineering as employees; and


- The program will be regarded as excellent.

*** More specifically, the following ambitions are critical to achieving our Mission, Vision, and Goals.


- To provide students with a meaningful basis in industry fundamentals through courses beginning the freshman year with exposure to and exercises in computational basics important to the industry.


- To simulate the processes employed by practicing petroleum engineers through courses including drilling, production, and reservoir engineering that lead to a capstone experience in the senior year.


- To involve students in real-world petroleum engineering experiments through industry involvement in classroom activities, professional organization seminars, and student internships.


- To enable students throughout the curriculum to use the sophisticated computer software of the modern petroleum engineering industry.


- To encourage students to share their knowledge through a strong emphasis on written and oral communications skills.


- To ensure that students recognize the need to assume professional and societal responsibilities in the global marketplace. Our courses address global and multicultural issues, providing students opportunities to understand models of social behavior and leadership different from those of their home economy.


- To challenge students to sharpen their aesthetic senses and embrace their own social and personal development.

Petroleum Engineering Program

Introduction

Introduction To Petroleum Engineering Program

Petroleum engineering is the application of the basic sciences to the development, recovery and field processing of oil and gas. Students are educated in the principles, procedures and practices of drilling, formation evaluation, reservoir studies, production, environmental protection, and profitability analysis.

The primary objective of the freshman and the sophomore years is to provide the students with necessary background in science and engineering. The junior and senior years are concentrated on petroleum engineering courses.

The job of petroleum engineers starts after the discovery of a structure suitable for oil and gas accumulation. Exploration wells are first drilled and tested to evaluate the economic aspects of the discovery and to obtain necessary data for the planning and development of the field. Petroleum reservoir engineers are normally responsible for determining the optimum number and locations of the wells and for establishing the production and recovery methods to achieve the maximum recovery in the most economical manner. This involves the utilization of basic and advanced sciences and computer technology.

The role of the petroleum production engineers comes next. These engineers, with the information provided by the reservoir engineers, are responsible for the design and implementation of well completions and subsurface and surface production facilities which are needed to produce the field and treat the produced fluids to produce oil and gas with the specifications needed for transportation and refining operations. Petroleum drilling engineers are responsible for the design, planning and supervision of the well drilling activities.

The Department's teaching and research laboratories are fully equipped with state-of-the art equipment. Covering drilling fluids, oil well cementing, rock and fluid properties, rock mechanics, quantitative analysis, thin sectioning, formation evaluation, enhanced oil recovery, production engineering, drilling simulator and drilling fluid flow loop.

The Department is linked to the University's main computer facilities in addition to having its own personal computer laboratory. The Department maintains its own reference library, which has a collection of references and textbooks in all Petroleum engineering areas.

Ø Petroleum Engineering Courses include:

Reservoir Engineering
Reservoir Engineering II,
Industrial Safety for Oil Field Operations,
Reservoir Modeling,
Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior of Petroleum Fluids,
Fractured Reservoir Characterization,
Transport Phenomena in Geo-systems

Drilling Engineering
Rock Mechanics in the Petroleum Industry,
Directional Drilling,
Horizontal Well Technology,
Drilling in Abnormal Pressure Zones,
Advanced Well Control Operations,
Practical Advances in Drilling Engineering,

Production Engineering
Offshore Technology,
Storage and Transportation of Crude Oil and Gas,
Oil Field Corrosion and Corrosion Control,
Natural Gas Sweetening and Dehydration,

Formation Evaluation
Formation Evaluation,
Petroleum Economics,
Introduction to Geo-statistics,
Senior Project,

Additional,
Physical Geology, Strength of Materials, Fluid Mechanics, Introduction to Petroleum Engineering, Reservoir Rock Properties, Reservoir Rock Laboratory, Phase Behavior of Reservoir Fluids
Reservoir Engineering, PVT Laboratory, Oil Well Drilling and Completion, Mud and Cement Laboratory, Petroleum Geology, Subsurface Mapping, Well Logging, Well Logging Laboratory, Industrial Training, Petroleum Production Engineering, Natural Gas Reservoir Engineering, Secondary Recovery, Well Testing, Production Equipment Design, Numerical Methods in Petroleum Engineering, Well Stimulation, Well Design

Requirements

B.S. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Each student majoring in Petroleum Engineering must complete the following courses. He should also maintain a minimum major and cumulative GPA of 2.00 or above at the time of graduation.

A - General Education Requirements (85 credit hours)

COMMUNICATION COURSES

Arabic (IAS 101, 201& 301)

6

English ( ENGL 101, 102 & 214

9

15

SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSES

Social Sciences (ECON 403)

3

3

ENGINEERING COURSES

Transport Phenomena (CHE 204)

3

Fortran Programming (ICS 101)

3

Electric Circuits (EE 204)

3

Thermodynamics (ME 203) and Materials Science (205)

6

Numerical Methods (SE 301)

3

18

SCIENCES

General Chemistry (CHEM 101 & 102)

8

Geology (GEOL 201& 318)

6

Calculus (MATH 101, 102 & 201), Differential Equations ( 202) & Statistics (STAT 319)

17

General Physics (PHYS 101&102)

8

39

ISLAMIC STUDIES COURSES

Islamic Studies ( IAS 111, 211, 311 & 4xx)

8

8

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES

Physical Education (PE 101&102)

2

2

B - Major Requirements (45 credit hours)

Reservoir Rock & Fluids Properties (PETE 204 & 205)

6

Drilling Engineering (PETE 203)

4

Formation Evaluation (PETE 303, 306, & 401)

9

Production Engineering (PETE 302 & 404)

7

Reservoir Engineering (PETE 301, 402, 405 & 410)

11

Others (PETE 201, 408, 411)

5

PETE Elective (PETE xxx)

3

C - Technical Elective (3 credit hours )

D - Summer Training (0 credit hours )

Each student must participate in an eight-week program of industrial experience and submit a formal report.

E- Total Program Requirements (133 credit hours)

The department's policy for recommending a non-petroleum engineering technical elective course is that it should be consistent with the career objective of the student. A technical elective course should either be a 300 or 400 level course subject to the approval of the Advisor and the Department Chairman.

Curriculum

Petroleum Engineering Degree Curriculum

First Year (Preparatory)

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

ENGL 001

Preparatory English I

15

5

8

ENGL 002

Preparatory English II

15

5

8

MATH 001

Preparatory Math I

3

1

4

MATH 002

Preparatory Math II

3

1

4

ME 001

Preparatory Shop I

0

2

1

ME 002

Preparatory Shop II

0

2

1

PE 001

Prep Phys. Education I

0

2

1

PE 002

Prep Phys. Education II

0

2

1

18

10

14

18

10

14

Second Year (Freshman)

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

CHEM101

General Chemistry I

3

4

4

CHEM102

General Chemistry II

3

4

4

ENGL 101

English Composition I

3

0

3

ENGL 102

English Composition II

3

0

3

MATH 101

Calculus I

4

0

4

MATH 102

Calculus II

4

0

4

PE 101

Physical Education I

0

2

1

IAS 101

Practical Grammar

2

0

2

PHYS 101

General Physics I

3

3

4

PE 102

Physical Education II

0

2

1

PHYS 102

General Physics II

3

3

4

13

9

16

15

9

18

Third Year (Sophomore)

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

CHE 204

Transport Phenomena I

3

0

3

ENGL 214

Technical Report Writing

3

0

3

GEOL 201

Physical Geology

2

3

3

ICS 101

Computer Programming

2

3

3

IAS 111

Belief & its Consequences

2

0

2

IAS 201

Objective Writing

2

0

2

MATH 201

Calculus III

3

0

3

MATH 202

Elem. Diff. Equations

3

0

3

ME 203

Thermodynamics I

3

0

3

PETE 203

Drilling Engineering

3

3

4

PETE 201

Intro Petroleum Eng.

1

0

1

PETE 205

Petroleum Fluid Prop.

2

3

3

PETE 204

Reservoir Rock Prop.

2

3

3

16

6

18

15

9

18

Fourth Year (Junior)

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

ECON 403

Engineering Economics

3

0

3

EE 204

Circuits and Electronics

2

3

3

HAS 211

Ethics in Islam

2

0

2

GEOL 318

Regional Geology

3

0

3

ME 205

Materials Science

2

3

3

IAS 301

Style of Literature

2

0

2

PETE 301

Reservoir Engineering

3

0

3

PETE 303

Well Logging

3

3

4

PETE 302

Subsurface Prod. Eng.

3

0

3

PETE 306

Well Testing

2

0

2

SE 301

Numerical Methods

3

0

3

STAT 319

Prob. & Stat. for Engrs.

2

3

3

16

3

17

14

9

17

Summer Session

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

PETE 399

Summer Training

0

0

0

Fifth Year (Senior)

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

COURSE

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

IAS 322

Human Rights in Islam

2

0

2

IAS 4xx

IAS Elective

2

0

2

PETE 405

Water flooding

2

0

2

PETE 401

Reservoir Description

3

0

3

PETE 408

Seminar

0

2

1

PETE 402

Reservoir Simulation

2

3

3

PETE 411

Senior Design Project

0

9

3

PETE 404

Prod. Facilities Design

3

3

4

PETE xxx

PETE Elective

3

0

3

PETE 410

Natural Gas Engineering

3

0

3

XE xxx

Technical Elective

3

0

3

10

11

14

13

6

15

Total Credit-hours Required: 133

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

PETE 201 Introduction to Petroleum Engineering (1-0-1)

The course's main goal is to provide the student with an overview of the petroleum industry: its history, its technical achievements, its role in the global-economy and its future prospects. A brief introduction to modern exploration, production and processing operations is included as well as highlights of the petroleum industry in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East.

Prerequisite: none

PETE 203 Drilling Engineering (3-3-4)

Description of rotary drilling systems and operations. Casing design, landing and cementing practices. Optimization of drilling parameters. well control and drilling hydraulics. Directional drilling, horizontal drilling, deviation control, offshore drilling and equipment, drilling problems and economics. Laboratory sessions cover drilling fluids and cement formulation and testing. Simulation of drilling operations and control

Prerequisite: PETE 201: Introduction to Petroleum Engineering

PETE 204 Reservoir Rock Properties (2-3-3)

Basic petrophysical properties of reservoir rocks including porosity, permeability, fluid saturation, electrical conductivity, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. Laboratory measurement of the reservoir rock characteristics mentioned above.

Co-requisite: PETE 201: Introduction to Petroleum Engineering

PETE 205 Petroleum Fluid Properties (2-3-3)

Study of the phase behavior of hydrocarbon systems as related to petroleum recovery. Ideal and real gas behavior, single and multicomponent two-phase systems, properties of reservoir fluids under various conditions of pressure and temperature. Laboratory tests on reservoir fluids.

Prerequisite: ME 203: Thermodynamics I,

PETE 201: Introduction to Petroleum Engineering

PETE 301 Reservoir Engineering (3-0-3)

Derivation of the general material balance equation. Estimation of water influx using steady and unsteady-state models. Application of the general material balance equation for determining initial oil in place and gas cap size and water influx constant under different drive mechanisms. Application of the general material balance equation for determining the initial gas in place for conventional gas reservoir. Estimation of the initial gas and condensate in place for gas condensate reservoir. Decline curve analysis.

Prerequisites: PETE 204: Reservoir Rock Properties

PETE 205: Petroleum Fluid Properties

PETE 302 Subsurface Production Engineering (3-3-4)

Study of the fundamentals and applications of completion and workover operations including various completion designs, reservoir and mechanical considerations, basic tubing design, subsurface equipment, completion and workover fluids, perforating, stimulation, sand control and remedial cementing. Horizontal well completion technology. Laboratory sessions involve actual completion and workover problem solving, and demonstration of the design and operation of basic completion and control equipment.

Prerequisite: PETE 203: Drilling Engineering

PETE 303 Well Logging (3-3-4)

Comprehensive study of modem well logging methods, open hole and cased hole log interpretation methods. Production logging. Design of logging programs and examples of applications.

Prerequisites: PETE 204: Reservoir Rock properties

PETE 306 Well Testing (2-0-2)

Derivation of the diffusivity equation for slightly compressible fluid. Solution of the diffusivity equation using Boltzman transformation. Pressure drawdown and buildup tests. Injection and fall-off tests. Average reservoir pressure. Reservoir limit tests. Type curve matching. Pulse and drill stem tests. Test design and instrumentation.

Prerequisite: PETE 301: Reservoir Engineering

PETE 350 & 351 Cooperative Work (0-0-9)

A continuous period of 28 weeks to be spent in the industry to acquire practical experience in different areas of the petroleum engineering. During this training period, the student gains in-depth exposure and appreciation of the petroleum engineering profession. The student is required to write a concise report, summarizing his experience and discussing the engineering work he was engaged in, and give a presentation of his work.

Prerequisites: ENGL 214: Tech. Report Writing
PETE 302: Subsurface Production Engineering

A minimum of 85 credit hours should be completed.

PETE 399 Summer Training ( 0 - 0 - 0)

A student of junior standing spends a period of eight weeks in the summer working in the industry to gain exposure to and appreciation of the petroleum engineering profession. On-the-job training can be acquired in any field of petroleum engineering. On completion of the training, the student is required to write a brief report on his work.

Prerequisite: ENGL 214:Technical. Report Writing

PETE 302: Subsurface Production Engineering

A minimum of 85 credit hours should be completed.

PETE 400 Special Topics (3-0-3)

The course will cover a special topic in one of the areas of the petroleum engineering discipline. Topics will be selected according to the faculty expertise and the students' interest and enrollment.

Prerequisite: Consent of the Department

PETE 401 Reservoir Description (3-0-3)

Principles and techniques of petroleum reservoir descriptions. Subsurface data from geological and engineering sources. Univariate and bivariate description. Estimation techniques. Reserve estimation methods.

Prerequisite: PETE 303: Well Logging

STAT 319: Probability and Statistics for Engineers

PETE 402 Reservoir Simulation (2-3-3)

Basic theory and practices in reservoir simulation, Formulation of equations governing single phase and multi-phase flow in porous media. Introduction to finite difference methods and solution techniques. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Applications using a black oil simulator.

Prerequisites: SE 301: Numerical Methods
PETE 301: Reservoir Engineering

PETE 404 Production Facilities Design (3-3-4)

Overview of petroleum surface operations including types, applications, and design of two and three phase separators; oil treatment equipment; vapor recovery processes; gas treatment processes and equipment; produced-water treatment and disposal; flowlines, gathering lines and transportation; oil, water and gas metering. Laboratory sessions cover design principles of production facilities leading to the complete design of one basic production unit.

Prerequisites: CHE; 204: Transport Phenomena I

PETE 405 Water Flooding (2-0-2)

Basic theoretical and design aspects of waterflooding processes. Review of capillary phenomena and relative permeability characteristics of reservoir rocks. Theory of immiscible displacement including piston-like and frontal advance mechanisms. Injectivity analysis and performance prediction of linear and pattern flooding. Heterogeneous reservoirs. Problems encountered in water flooding projects.

Prerequisites: CHE; 204: Transport Phenomena I

PETE 301: Reservoir Engineering

PETE 406 Improved Oil Recovery (3-0-3)

Introduction to current techniques of improved oil recovery. Principles of thermal recovery, chemical flooding. and miscible gas displacement methods, performance prediction. Advantages and drawbacks of each displacement methods. Selection criteria for target reservoirs.

Prerequisite: PETE 301: Reservoir Engineering

PETE 407 Petroleum Economics (3-0-3)

Introduction to the standards and practices of economic analysis in the petroleum industry. Brief review of the principles of economic evaluation, typical decision making situations including risk analysis, alternative reservoir depletion schemes utilizing decline curve analysis, secondary stage development options, and various improved oil recovery methods. Analysis involves reserve estimation and forecasting of capital investment, operating cost, and manpower requirement.

Prerequisite:Senior Standing for PETE and Earth Sciences Students

PETE 408 Seminar (0-2-1)

Lectures are presented on subjects related to preparation of technical presentations, use of visual aids, and platform and vocal techniques. Each student is then required, as a practice, to prepare and deliver a presentation on selected subjects. Each presentation is discussed and methods for improvements are highlighted. Finally, students are evaluated for their final presentations.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing.

PETE 409 Artificial Lift (3-0-3)

Equipment and techniques of modern production operations. Analysis of inflow performance, multiphase flow and well performance. Artificial lift methods and applications including gas-lift, electric submersible pumping, and sucker rod pumping. Overview of off-shore production operations.

Prerequisite: PETE 302: Subsurface Production Engineering

PETE 410 Natural Gas Engineering (3-0-3)

Estimation of gas reserves using different forms of the general material balance equation for gas reservoir. Prediction of gas reservoir performance subject to water drive. Derivation of the basic flow equations for real gas and their solutions and applications for analyzing gas well testing. Analysis of hydraulically fractured gas well tests. Gas field development. Storage of natural gas.

Prerequisite: PETE 301: Reservoir Engineering

PETE 306: Well Testing

PETE 411 Senior Design Project (0-9-3)

Experimental and/or theoretical approaches with possible application of computer techniques to integrate various components of the curriculum in a comprehensive engineering design experience. Design of a complete project including identification of a problem, formulation of design, preparation of specifications. consideration of alternative feasible solutions. The work will be supervised by a Faculty member. The student has to submit a detailed final project report and present his work.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing.

ENGL 214:Technical. Report Writing

Approval of the advisor

Graduate Program

Graduate Program Introduction

The Department of Petroleum Engineering offers graduate studies leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The M.S. program was started in 1982 and the Ph.D. program in 1985, and both programs feature multinational student enrollment. As of June 2005, the Department has conferred 59 MS and 3 PhD degrees.

The Programs are designed to broaden the student's knowledge in all areas of Petroleum Engineering and to strengthen and deepen the student's understanding in one or more areas of specialty. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the student's research skills and on achieving professional competence in the areas of specialization.

The current areas of research and study include Drilling Engineering, Formation Evaluation, Production Engineering, and Reservoir Engineering.

Teaching & Research Facilities

The Department has the following modern, well-equipped laboratories for teaching and advanced research:

1. Flow Loop Lab.

2. Drilling Fluid & Cement Lab.

3. Quantitative Analysis Lab.

4. Core Preparation Lab.

5. Rock Mechanics Lab.

6. Enhanced Oil Recovery Lab.

7. Fluid Properties Lab.

8. Rock Properties Lab.

9. Production Engineering Lab.

10. Drilling Simulator Lab.

The Department's research is directed towards achieving excellence in the areas of Production Engineering and Reservoir Engineering, which are vital for the development of petroleum resources in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

M. S. Program

M. S. Program

Master of Science:

Requirements:

Acceptance requirements, in addition to the College of Graduate Studies requirements outlined in this bulletin that include:

Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering equivalent to the KFUPM current undergraduate program in length, content, and quality, or

Bachelor of Science degree in a closely related engineering science. Applicant will make up any course deficiencies without earning graduate credit.

The program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours viz. core courses of 12 credit hours, elective courses of 12 credit hours, and thesis work of 6 credit hours. The presentation of a satisfactory seminar is also a part of the program. A maximum of 6 credits in the elective courses may be taken from other engineering and science graduate courses.

The elective courses should be chosen in order to provide a coherent study of certain well defined areas and should also serve as a basis for furthering the student's personal interests, future graduate studies, or practice in the oil industry.

(Proposed Academic Program)

COURSE #

TITLE

LT

LB

CR

FIRST YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

PETE

532

Well Performance

3

0

3

PETE

544

Natural Gas Engineering

3

0

3

PETE

560

Mathematical Methods in Petroleum Engineering

3

0

3

9

0

9

9

FIRST YEAR

SECOND SEMESTER

PETE

545

Advanced Reservoir Simulation

3

0

3

PETE

599

Seminar

1

0

0

PETE

5xx

PETE Elective I*

3

0

3

XXX

5xx

Technical Elective I**

3

0

3

10

0

9

9

SECOND YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

PETE

5xx

PETE Elective II*

3

0

3

XXX

5xx

Technical Elective II**

3

0

3

6

0

6

6

SECOND YEAR

SECOND SEMESTER

PETE

610

Thesis

0

0

6

0

0

6

6

30

* From graduate courses offered in Petroleum Engineering.

** From relevant courses offered university-wide, including the Petroleum Engineering Department.

Ph. D Program

Ph D Program

Program Objectives:

The objectives of the program are to promote independent thinking and creative petroleum engineering methodology by developing original research, and to prepare highly qualified personnel in the field of petroleum engineering such as researchers, senior engineers, and university faculty.

Admission Requirements:


An M.S. Degree in Petroleum Engineering equivalent to the current KFUPM Petroleum Engineering Master's Program in scope and quality, or


A Master's degree in other engineering and closely related sciences. Applicants will make up any course deficiencies without earning graduate credit.


A cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above on a 4.0 scale


Acceptance scores of the TOFEL and GRE (Aptitude and Subject) tests.

Academic Requirements:

1. Complete a minimum of 30 credits.
a) A Minimum of 21 credit hours in 500 or higher level Petroleum Engineering courses.
b) A Minimum of 9 credit hours in 500 or higher level courses as a minor in other engineering disciplines or sciences.

2. Successfully pass the Entrance Examination to be held before the end of the first semester of study.

3. Present two satisfactory seminars.

4. Maintain a cumulative CPA of 3.00 or above in all graduate courses.

5. Maintain a cumulative CPA of 3.00 or above in all undergraduate deficiency courses.

6. Successfully pass the Comprehensive Examination upon completion of the course work, i.e. 30 credit hours.

7. Successfully complete a dissertation and its defense

Course Descriptions

Graduate Course Description

PETE 512 Advanced Drilling Engineering I (3-0-3)

This course provides the student with a thorough understanding of the drilling operations and the various factors affecting them. Topics covered include drilling fluid hydraulics, hole stability, penetration rate, buckling and bending of drilling strings, well trajectory control, and optimization of drilling operations.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 513 Advanced Drilling Fluids (3-0-3)

The course provides an in-depth coverage of drilling fluids chemistry and archeology. Coverage includes both classical and evolving drilling fluid systems, clay chemistry, shale stabilization, drilling fluid additives and contaminants, and addresses the various problems and solutions related to drilling fluids.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 523 Well Test Analysis (3-0-3)

The course provides students with the theoretical background and skills needed for well test design and analysis. Solutions of the fundamental flow equation including wellbore storage and skin for slightly compressible fluids are presented and discussed. The general buildup theory and its application to infinite and bounded reservoirs is addressed and discussed. Analysis of common well tests using recently developed methods and techniques to determine reservoir parameters of homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 524 Advanced Well Logging (3-0-3)

The course provides the students with the basic and advanced skills and techniques needed to interpret modern well logs. These skills and techniques are then used for identification and evaluation of potential hydrocarbon zones from a standard suite of logs. Clean and shaly formation interpretations are covered. Computer Applications are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor

PETE532 Well Performance 3-0-3)

The course provides detailed study of the inflow performance relationships and the horizontal, vertical and inclined multiphase flow correlations and mechanistic models. These are then used to determine the current and future performance of the well and the optimum size of the tubing and flow line as well as the optimum production strategy for the whole life of the well. The course emphasizes computer applications through the utilization of student-developed and commercially available software.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 533 Surface Production Facilities (3-0-3)

The course provides a detailed description, performance analysis, and design of oil, water and gas handling facilities. Design of individual components of the production system using hand calculations is first emphasized to provide complete understanding of the physics of the various processes; then, computer programs are utilized. The course concludes with a term project. The project integrates learned material for the design of a complete surface production system.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor

PETE 543 Advanced Waterflooding (3-0-3)

Detailed analysis of the theory, design, and performance prediction of waterflooding of oil reservoirs. Fundamentals of rock and fluid interactions. The fractional flow equation. Linear immiscible displacement. Prediction of areal sweep efficiency using the CGM method and stream-tube models. Water injectivity in various flood patterns. Heterogeneous reservoirs.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 544 Natural Gas Engineering (3-0-3)

The course is intended to provide students with the techniques needed to estimate gas reserves for normally and abnormally pressured gas reservoirs, water drive gas reservoirs, and gas condensate reservoirs. Production forecasting and decline curve analysis. Productivity enhancement through gas cycling. Fundamental gas flow equation and its solutions in terms of pressure, pressure squared and pseudo function. Gas well test design and analysis. Analysis of hydraulically fractured gas well tests. Gas field development including reservoir deliverability, total system analysis (inflow/outflow performance of gas wells), and optimum development patterns.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 545 Advanced Reservoir Simulation (3-0-3)

The theory of petroleum reservoir simulation with modern modeling and prediction techniques. Finite difference representation of flow equations. Construction of grid systems and time step selection. Modeling of multi-phase flow. Solution methods of a system of equations.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 551 Petroleum Economic Analysis (3-0-3)

Statistical methods and operations research, application to project screening and management decision, evaluation of processing facilities. Engineering justification for capital outlay in the petroleum industry.

Prerequisite: PETE 550- Petroleum Economics.

PETE 560 Mathematical Methods in Petroleum Engineering (3-0-3)

The course covers selected topics on advanced mathematical and numerical methods and modeling in petroleum engineering. This includes numerical differentiation, integration, non-linear regression, and numerical inversion of La Place transforms. Applications include analysis of rock properties, fluid properties, and reservoir engineering.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 580 Virtual Petroleum Engineering (3-0-3)

The course presents real problems and scenarios that simulate a petroleum engineering office environment. A multidisciplinary approach will be the dominant approach to all presented problems. Realistic office settings and simulation of field problems will be used to enhance the learning experience. The course will emphasize problem solving and learning through well-structured assignments and class discussions. Experienced industry experts may be utilized at certain stages of the course.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor

PETE 590 Special Topics in Petroleum Engineering (3-0-3)

Advanced topics selected from the major areas of petroleum engineering covering recent developments.

PETE 599 Seminar (1-0-0)

Graduate students working towards either M.S. or Ph.D. degrees, are required to attend the seminars given by faculty, visiting scholars, and fellow graduate students. Additionally, each student must present at least one seminar on a timely research topic. Among other things, this course is designed to give the student an overview of research in the Department, and a familiarity with the research methodology, journals, and professional societies in his discipline. Graded on a Pass or Fail basis.

PETE 610 Thesis (0-0-6)

The student has to undertake and complete a research topic, under the supervision of a graduate faculty member, to investigate a specific problem in Petroleum Engineering.

PETE 616 Offshore Drilling Engineering (3-0-3)

Offshore platforms and mobile vessels. Motion compensators and risers design. Offshore rigs and equipment. Offshore directional drilling. Wellhead and well control systems.

PETE 617 Advanced Drilling Engineering II (3-0-3)

This course is intended to cover the recent advances and changes in drilling technology. Emphasis will be on the areas of horizontal and multilateral drilling and completion, slim holes and evolving drilling techniques. Optimization and cost-effective drilling practices are studied in detail with the utilization of available computer packages.

Prerequisite: PETE 512

PETE 627 Automated Well Test Analysis (3-0-3)

The course is intended to introduce the graduate student to the latest technology in well interpretation and design using interactive well test computer models. Common types of well tests and reservoir models, and the identification under various conditions of oil and gas wells are presented and discussed. The graduate student will demonstrate his understanding of the course material through development of a well test program to estimate reservoir parameters based on non-linear regression techniques for several reservoir models.

Prerequisite: PETE 523

PETE 628 Reservoir Characterization (3-0-3)

The course is intended to provide the student with advanced concepts in geostatistics. Spacial correlation, variograms, and covariograms of petrophysical variables. Static (cores, logs, seismic) and dynamic (flow) data are used to characterize the reservoirs. Estimation of spacial distribution of variables using kriging, co-kriging, and conditional simulation. Applications of geostatistical techniques to construct reservoir simulation models.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 635 Well Stimulation (3-0-3)

The course starts with detailed discussions of the various types of formation damage, their causes and effect on well productivity. The various stimulation and damage removal methods are then introduced with detailed study of the theory, design and pre- and post-treatment analysis of sandstone and carbonate matrix acidizing. At the conclusion of the course, the student should be able to design a complete stimulation job starting from the selection of the candidate well and ending with the post-treatment performance evaluation.

Prerequisite: PETE 532 or consent of instructor

PETE 637 Applied Hydraulic Fracturing (3-0-3)

The course provides the student with the knowledge and tools needed to design and analyze hydraulic and acid fracturing jobs. An overview of the fundamentals of rock mechanics and its application to hydraulic fracturing will be presented. Then, the data requirements and various elements of massive hydraulic fracturing treatment design are covered in detail. Finally, the design of fracture treatment using analytical tools and commercial simulators is discussed in detail. The course concludes with a term project to design a fracturing treatment and evaluate the post treatment performance of the well.

Prerequisite: PETE 532

PETE 638 Artificial Lift (3-0-3)

This course is designed to enable the student to first make decisions on the need for artificial lift and the best artificial lift method for any given well and field conditions; then, to design and optimize the artificial lift installation. Students taking this course are expected to be familiar with well performance evaluation and analysis. Therefore, the course concentrates on discussing the various types and applications of artificial lift methods with detailed study of the theory, design and analysis of gas lift, electric submersible pump, sucker rod pump, downhole separations and hydraulic pump installations. Recent advances in artificial lift technology will also be highlighted.

Prerequisite: PETE 532

PETE 645 Fluid Flow in Porous Media (3-0-3)

Generalization of Darcy's law and multiphase fluid flow in porous media. Concept of relative permeability. Performance of displacement mechanisms. Buckley~Leverett theory and frontal advance calculations. Dietz method, original and modified Style's methods.

PETE 648 Enhanced Oil Recovery (3-0-3)

The theoretical and design aspects of enhanced oil recovery methods as practiced in post-waterflood oil reservoirs. Miscible displacement methods including dry, rich, and liquefied petroleum gas. Hot fluid injection. In-situ combustion. Chemical processes employing polymers and/or surfactants. EOR screening criteria.

Prerequisite: PETE 543

PETE 649 Advanced Fluid Properties (3-0-3)

Theoretical and empirical aspects of the properties of petroleum fluids relevant to petroleum reservoir calculations. Phase behavior. PVT tests and correlations. Phase equilibria. Equations of state and phase behavior calculations. Petroleum fluid characterization. Interfacial tension in multi-phase systems. Applications in reservoir simulation.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 670 Reservoir Rock Mechanics (3-0-3)

The course provides detailed coverage of the fundamentals of rock mechanics including the theories of elasticity and failure mechanics, borehole stresses and acoustic wave propagation. Laboratory and field methods of acquiring rock mechanics data relevant to field applications are discussed in detail. The course concludes with thorough discussions of the application of rock mechanics in studying borehole stability, sand control, reservoir compaction and fracturing.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 685 Artificial Intelligence in Petroleum Engineering (3-0-3)

The course provides coverage of both theoretical and programming aspects of artificial intelligence techniques with applications to the various areas of petroleum engineering. The basics of Expert Systems, Artificial Neural Networks, Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Programming will be covered with their applications in reservoir characterization, reservoir engineering, drilling engineering and production operations. The course is concluded with individual projects utilizing commercial software to solve real problems.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

PETE 699 Seminar (0-0-0)

Attendance of departmental seminars given by faculty, graduate students and visiting scholars. A graduate (Ph.D.) student is expected to contribute seminars on literature searches of topics of current interest to Petroleum Engineering. Graded on a Pass or Fail basis.

PETE 710 Ph.D. Dissertation (0-0-12)

Involves original research on a chosen problem within the field of Petroleum Engineering. Although the work can be theoretical, experimental research is encouraged. The overall result should be a scientific contribution adding to further knowledge in petroleum engineering.

Copyright Department of Petroleum Engineering 2006

Source: http://eng.kuniv.edu/petroleum/

Source: http://kfupm.edu.sa/pet/

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